Posted by: sutrisno | October 9, 2014

=== Install Request Tracker 4 on Centos 6.5===

Request Tracker adalah sistem ticketing helpdesk, saya mencoba install paket tersebut di centos 6.5

rt

ini langkahnya
Kita update yum repositorynya
#yum update
#yum install file ntp vim-enhanced man man-pages wget yum-utils
# ipv4addr=$(ip -f inet addr show dev eth0 | sed -n ‘s/^ *inet *\([.0-9]*\).*/\1/p’)
# printf “$ipv4addr\t$(hostname -f)\t$(hostname -s)\n” >> /etc/hosts
# unset -v ipv4addr

Verify the entry.
# cat /etc/hosts

127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain localhost4 localhost4.localdomain4
::1 localhost localhost.localdomain localhost6 localhost6.localdomain6
192.168.0.170 rt.corp.dudulz.com rt

+++++++++++++++++++
127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain localhost4 localhost4.localdomain4
::1 localhost localhost.localdomain localhost6 localhost6.localdomain6
+++++++++++++++++++

# vim /etc/sysconfig/selinux

# This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
# SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
# enforcing – SELinux security policy is enforced.
# permissive – SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
# disabled – No SELinux policy is loaded.
SELINUX=disabled ———–> edit
# SELINUXTYPE= can take one of these two values:
# targeted – Targeted processes are protected,
# mls – Multi Level Security protection.
SELINUXTYPE=targeted

# sestatus
SELinux status: disabled

# vim /etc/ntp.conf


# Permit all access over the loopback interface. This could
# be tightened as well, but to do so would effect some of
# the administrative functions.
restrict 127.0.0.1
restrict -6 ::1

# Hosts on local network are less restricted.
#restrict 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 nomodify notrap

# Use public servers from the pool.ntp.org project.
# Please consider joining the pool (http://www.pool.ntp.org/join.html).
#server 0.centos.pool.ntp.org ——–> edit
#server 1.centos.pool.ntp.org ——–> edit
#server 2.centos.pool.ntp.org ——–> edit

# Use internal NTP Server (AD/DC01)
server 192.168.0.254 iburst ——> edit
# service ntpd start
# chkconfig ntpd on; chkconfig –list ntpd
ntpd 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off
# ntpq -pn
remote refid st t when poll reach delay offset jitter
==============================================================================
*192.168.0.254 50.23.135.154 3 u 50 64 37 0.892 11.750 3.961

# ntpstat
synchronised to NTP server (10.1.260.11) at stratum 4
time correct to within 125 ms
polling server every 512 s
# vim /etc/sysconfig/iptables
# Firewall configuration written by system-config-firewall
# Manual customization of this file is not recommended.
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
-A INPUT -m state –state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -m state –state NEW -m tcp -p tcp –dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -m state –state NEW -m tcp -p tcp –dport 80 -j ACCEPT ——> tambah
-A INPUT -m state –state NEW -m tcp -p tcp –dport 443 -j ACCEPT ——> tambah
-A INPUT -j REJECT –reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
-A FORWARD -j REJECT –reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
COMMIT

# service iptables restart
# yum install http://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/fedora-epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
# yum repolist
# yum-config-manager –enable epel
# cat >> /etc/yum.repos.d/MariaDB.repo < [mariadb]
> name = MariaDB
> baseurl = http://yum.mariadb.org/5.5/centos6-amd64
> gpgkey=https://yum.mariadb.org/RPM-GPG-KEY-MariaDB
> gpgcheck=1
> EOF
# cat /etc/yum.repos.d/MariaDB.repo
[mariadb]
name = MariaDB
baseurl = http://yum.mariadb.org/5.5/centos6-amd64
gpgkey=https://yum.mariadb.org/RPM-GPG-KEY-MariaDB
gpgcheck=1
# yum repolist
# yum install MariaDB-server MariaDB-client MariaDB-devel
# service mysql start
# chkconfig –list mysql
mysql 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off
# yum install httpd httpd-devel mod_ssl mod_fcgid make gcc openssl-devel gd-devel perl-CPAN perl-YAML perl-GD graphviz-perl
# service httpd start
# chkconfig httpd on
# useradd -r -s /sbin/nologin rt
# usermod -aG rt apache

wget https://download.bestpractical.com/pub/rt/release/rt-4.2.8.tar.gz
# tar xf rt-4.2.8.tar.gz -C /opt
# cd /opt/rt4
#mv rt-4.2.8 rt4
#cd rt4
#./configure –with-web-user=apache –with-web-group=apache –enable-graphviz –enable-gd

# cpan

Would you like me to configure as much as possible automatically? [yes]

cpan[1]> o conf prerequisites_policy follow
cpan[2]> o conf build_requires_install_policy yes
cpan[3]> o conf commit
cpan[4]> q

# make testdeps
# make fixdeps
# make testdeps
/usr/bin/perl ./sbin/rt-test-dependencies –verbose –with-mysql –with-fastcgi
perl:
>=5.8.3(5.10.1) …found
….
….
USERLOGO dependencies:
Convert::Color …found

All dependencies have been found.
# make install

Congratulations. RT is now installed.

You must now configure RT by editing /opt/rt4/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm.

(You will definitely need to set RT’s database password in
/opt/rt4/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm before continuing. Not doing so could be
very dangerous. Note that you do not have to manually add a
database user or set up a database for RT. These actions will be
taken care of in the next step.)

After that, you need to initialize RT’s database by running
‘make initialize-database’
# make initialize-database
/usr/bin/perl -I/opt/rt4/local/lib -I/opt/rt4/lib sbin/rt-setup-database –action init –prompt-for-dba-password
In order to create or update your RT database, this script needs to connect to your mysql instance on localhost as root
Please specify that user’s database password below. If the user has no database
password, just press return.

Password:
Working with:
Type: mysql
Host: localhost
Name: rt4
User: rt_user
DBA: root
max_allowed_packet is set to 1.0M, which limits the maximum attachment or email size that RT can process. Consider adjusting MySQL’s max_allowed_packet setting.
Now creating a mysql database rt4 for RT.
Done.
Now populating database schema.
Done.
Now inserting database ACLs.
Granting access to rt_user@’localhost’ on rt4.
Done.
Now inserting RT core system objects.
Done.
Now inserting data.
Done inserting data.
Done.

MAY
10
Install Request Tracker 4
The argument could be made Request Tracker is the de facto standard when it comes to issue tracking systems. Maybe the only drawback of RT is the slight learning curve required to deploy it. My objective for this post is to provide a sample solution that alleviates this.

The core components required for installation:
CentOS (or if you prefer the Ubuntu/Debian version of this tutorial)
MariaDB
Apache HTTP Server
Request Tracker

1. Operating System
Our solution will be using the CentOS-6.4-x86_64-minimal.iso image. The aim of this image is to install a very basic CentOS 6.4 system, with the minimum number of packages needed to have a functional system. This post won’t document the install process for CentOS 6 considering each organization has different requirements. The basic stages of the OS installation consist of language, storage, hostname, network, timezone, and setting the root password.

Note: All commands are run within the context of the root user account unless otherwise specified.

# 1.1 Updates and core packages
Make sure to update the system before we get things started.
# yum update

Lets also install the following packages that are not included by default.
# yum install file ntp vim-enhanced man man-pages wget yum-utils

# 1.2 hosts file
It’s recommended to add a hostname entry (FQDN and short), of the local computer, to the hosts file. You can update the entry manually (via text editor) or run the following set of commands.
# ipv4addr=$(ip -f inet addr show dev eth0 | sed -n ‘s/^ *inet *\([.0-9]*\).*/\1/p’)
# printf “$ipv4addr\t$(hostname -f)\t$(hostname -s)\n” >> /etc/hosts
# unset -v ipv4addr

Verify the entry.
# cat /etc/hosts

127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain localhost4 localhost4.localdomain4
::1 localhost localhost.localdomain localhost6 localhost6.localdomain6
10.1.260.43 rt.corp.example.com rt

# 1.3 SELinux
My use case doesn’t require SELinux to be active, so I will disable it in my configuration. If you have a particular requirement that states SELinux be enabled, then further modification and testing (in addition to this tutorial) may be necessary to result in a successful solution. The Request Tracker Wiki SELinux page should point you in the right direction.
# vim /etc/sysconfig/selinux

# This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
# SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
# enforcing – SELinux security policy is enforced.
# permissive – SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
# disabled – No SELinux policy is loaded.
SELINUX=disabled
# SELINUXTYPE= can take one of these two values:
# targeted – Targeted processes are protected,
# mls – Multi Level Security protection.
SELINUXTYPE=targeted

Reboot the computer for the change to take effect. After logging in after the reboot, verify SELinux is disabled.
# sestatus
SELinux status: disabled

# 1.4 Network Time Protocol (NTP)
Time synchronization is an often overlooked, but a very essential, configuration step for new server deployments. In my configuration, I will have my request tracker server sync with an Active Directory domain controller (which holds the PDC emulator FSMO role) on my private network. We will need to modify the ntp.conf file with a text editor and start the NTP daemon (and also set it for autostart at boot time). Notice that I “comment out” the default public pool.ntp.org virtual cluster servers. You may want to leave these enabled if you don’t have a particular time source to sync with.
# vim /etc/ntp.conf


# Permit all access over the loopback interface. This could
# be tightened as well, but to do so would effect some of
# the administrative functions.
restrict 127.0.0.1
restrict -6 ::1

# Hosts on local network are less restricted.
#restrict 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 nomodify notrap

# Use public servers from the pool.ntp.org project.
# Please consider joining the pool (http://www.pool.ntp.org/join.html).
#server 0.centos.pool.ntp.org
#server 1.centos.pool.ntp.org
#server 2.centos.pool.ntp.org

# Use internal NTP Server (AD/DC01)
server 10.1.260.11 iburst

#broadcast 192.168.1.255 autokey # broadcast server
#broadcastclient # broadcast client
#broadcast 224.0.1.1 autokey # multicast server
#multicastclient 224.0.1.1 # multicast client
#manycastserver 239.255.254.254 # manycast server
#manycastclient 239.255.254.254 autokey # manycast client

Start the NTP daemon.
# service ntpd start
Starting ntpd: [ OK ]

Set NTP daemon for autostart at boot time and verify.
# chkconfig ntpd on; chkconfig –list ntpd
ntpd 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off

We can verify the NTP status by running the following commands:
# ntpq -pn
remote refid st t when poll reach delay offset jitter
==============================================================================
*10.1.260.11 50.23.135.154 3 u 50 64 37 0.892 11.750 3.961

# ntpstat
synchronised to NTP server (10.1.260.11) at stratum 4
time correct to within 125 ms
polling server every 512 s

# 1.5 Firewall
We need to add firewall rules to open both the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) ports for communication between our server and external users. Take note the HTTP port will only service as a redirect to HTTPS.
# vim /etc/sysconfig/iptables

# Firewall configuration written by system-config-firewall
# Manual customization of this file is not recommended.
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
-A INPUT -m state –state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -m state –state NEW -m tcp -p tcp –dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -m state –state NEW -m tcp -p tcp –dport 80 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -m state –state NEW -m tcp -p tcp –dport 443 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -j REJECT –reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
-A FORWARD -j REJECT –reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
COMMIT

Restart the firewall service for the change to take effect.
# service iptables restart
iptables: Flushing firewall rules: [ OK ]
iptables: Setting chains to policy ACCEPT: filter [ OK ]
iptables: Unloading modules: [ OK ]
iptables: Applying firewall rules: [ OK ]

# 1.6 Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL)
Our solution will require the inclusion of the EPEL YUM repository for the mod_fcgid package. Visit the EPEL site to verify you grab the latest version of the epel-release RPM package file. At the date of this post, the following command will download and install the RPM package:
# yum install http://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/fedora-epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm

Lets verify the EPEL repository is enabled.
# yum repolist
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
epel/metalink | 9.0 kB 00:00
* base: mirrors.syringanetworks.net
* epel: mirrors.syringanetworks.net
* extras: ftp.osuosl.org
* updates: linux.mirrors.es.net
epel | 3.9 kB 00:00
epel/primary_db | 5.1 MB 00:00
repo id repo name status
base CentOS-6 – Base 6,381
epel Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux 6 – x86_64 8,754
extras CentOS-6 – Extras 12
updates CentOS-6 – Updates 647
vmware-tools VMware Tools 43
repolist: 15,837

If the repository is not enabled, you can run the following command to enable it:
# yum-config-manager –enable epel

2. Database
Our solution will use MariaDB for the RT data store. MariaDB is an enhanced, drop-in replacement for MySQL. Visit the MariaDB site for more information.

# 2.1 MariaDB package repository
Lets first add the MariaDB repo to our local YUM configuration.
# cat >> /etc/yum.repos.d/MariaDB.repo < [mariadb]
> name = MariaDB
> baseurl = http://yum.mariadb.org/5.5/centos6-amd64
> gpgkey=https://yum.mariadb.org/RPM-GPG-KEY-MariaDB
> gpgcheck=1
> EOF

Verify.
# cat /etc/yum.repos.d/MariaDB.repo
[mariadb]
name = MariaDB
baseurl = http://yum.mariadb.org/5.5/centos6-amd64
gpgkey=https://yum.mariadb.org/RPM-GPG-KEY-MariaDB
gpgcheck=1

Then also verify the repository is enabled.
# yum repolist
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
* base: mirrors.syringanetworks.net
* epel: mirror.pnl.gov
* extras: ftp.osuosl.org
* updates: linux.mirrors.es.net
mariadb | 1.9 kB 00:00
mariadb/primary_db | 15 kB 00:00
repo id repo name status
base CentOS-6 – Base 6,381
epel Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux 6 – x86_64 8,754
extras CentOS-6 – Extras 12
mariadb MariaDB 9
updates CentOS-6 – Updates 647
vmware-tools VMware Tools 43
repolist: 15,846

# 2.2 MariaDB install
Install the MariaDB components.
# yum install MariaDB-server MariaDB-client MariaDB-devel

# 2.3 MySQL (MariaDB) daemon
Start the MySQL daemon.
# service mysql start

Verify the MySQL daemon is set for autostart at boot.
# chkconfig –list mysql
mysql 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off

3. Web Server
We will be using the tried-and-true Apache HTTP Server as the web server component for our solution.

# 3.1 Download and install
Download and install httpd and other RT dependency packages.
# yum install httpd httpd-devel mod_ssl mod_fcgid make gcc openssl-devel gd-devel perl-CPAN perl-YAML perl-GD graphviz-perl

# 3.2 httpd daemon
Start the httpd daemon.
# service httpd start

Set the httpd daemon for autostart at boot.
# chkconfig httpd on

4. Request Tracker (RT)
We are now at the stage of the process to get Request Tracker installed with a base configuration.

# 4.1 Users and group
Create the rt system account user and user private group (UPG).
# useradd -r -s /sbin/nologin rt

Add the apache user to the rt group.
# usermod -aG rt apache

# 4.2 Stage RT build environment
Download the latest RT 4 compressed tarball, unpack and navigate into the directory.
# cd
# wget http://download.bestpractical.com/pub/rt/release/rt.tar.gz
# tar xf rt.tar.gz -C /tmp
# cd /tmp/rt-*

# 4.3 RT Configure script
We will be running the configure script with a number of default and explicit options. Since we haven’t defined it otherwise, our default install path location will be /opt/rt4.
# ./configure –with-web-user=apache –with-web-group=apache –enable-graphviz –enable-gd

# 4.4 Perl CPAN.pm
The installation of RT requires we enter the Perl CPAN.pm shell before running the RT dependency checker. Within the shell, lets set the configuration to automate the majority of the module installs.
# cpan

Would you like me to configure as much as possible automatically? [yes]

cpan[1]> o conf prerequisites_policy follow
cpan[2]> o conf build_requires_install_policy yes
cpan[3]> o conf commit
cpan[4]> q

# 4.5 RT Perl dependencies
For the few times you may be prompted for an install, select the default choice. Iterate the make fixdeps command until you reach the output statement All dependencies have been found.
# make testdeps
# make fixdeps

Verify.
# make testdeps
/usr/bin/perl ./sbin/rt-test-dependencies –verbose –with-mysql –with-fastcgi
perl:
>=5.8.3(5.10.1) …found
users:
rt group (rt) …found
bin owner (root) …found
libs owner (root) …found
libs group (bin) …found
web owner (apache) …found
web group (apache) …found
CLI dependencies:
Term::ReadKey …found
Getopt::Long >= 2.24 …found
HTTP::Request::Common …found
Term::ReadLine …found
Text::ParseWords …found
LWP …found
CORE dependencies:
DateTime >= 0.44 …found
Class::ReturnValue >= 0.40 …found
Text::Quoted >= 2.02 …found
Regexp::IPv6 …found
HTML::TreeBuilder …found
CSS::Squish >= 0.06 …found
Encode >= 2.39 …found
DateTime::Locale >= 0.40 …found
Module::Versions::Report >= 1.05 …found
MIME::Entity >= 5.425 …found
Digest::SHA …found
List::MoreUtils …found
DBI >= 1.37 …found
Locale::Maketext::Lexicon >= 0.32 …found
Devel::StackTrace >= 1.19 …found
Digest::base …found
HTML::FormatText …found
Text::Password::Pronounceable …found
Devel::GlobalDestruction …found
Time::ParseDate …found
File::Temp >= 0.19 …found
Locale::Maketext >= 1.06 …found
Tree::Simple >= 1.04 …found
Text::Template >= 1.44 …found
Scalar::Util …found
HTML::Quoted …found
HTML::Scrubber >= 0.08 …found
File::Spec >= 0.8 …found
DBIx::SearchBuilder >= 1.59 …found
Sys::Syslog >= 0.16 …found
Mail::Mailer >= 1.57 …found
File::ShareDir …found
Regexp::Common …found
Digest::MD5 >= 2.27 …found
Cache::Simple::TimedExpiry …found
File::Glob …found
Class::Accessor >= 0.34 …found
Locale::Maketext::Fuzzy …found
Time::HiRes …found
Text::Wrapper …found
Regexp::Common::net::CIDR …found
Net::CIDR …found
Log::Dispatch >= 2.23 …found
UNIVERSAL::require …found
Email::Address …found
DASHBOARDS dependencies:
HTML::RewriteAttributes >= 0.05 …found
URI >= 1.59 …found
MIME::Types …found
FASTCGI dependencies:
FCGI::ProcManager …found
FCGI >= 0.74 …found
GD dependencies:
GD::Text …found
GD …found
GD::Graph …found
GPG dependencies:
PerlIO::eol …found
GnuPG::Interface …found
GRAPHVIZ dependencies:
IPC::Run >= 0.90 …found
GraphViz …found
ICAL dependencies:
Data::ICal …found
MAILGATE dependencies:
Pod::Usage …found
Getopt::Long …found
LWP::UserAgent …found
MASON dependencies:
Storable >= 2.08 …found
CSS::Squish >= 0.06 …found
Apache::Session >= 1.53 …found
Errno …found
Devel::StackTrace >= 1.19 …found
IPC::Run3 …found
CGI::Cookie >= 1.20 …found
Text::WikiFormat >= 0.76 …found
XML::RSS >= 1.05 …found
HTML::Mason >= 1.43 …found
Digest::MD5 >= 2.27 …found
JSON …found
MYSQL dependencies:
DBD::mysql >= 2.1018 …found
PSGI dependencies:
CGI::Emulate::PSGI …found
CGI >= 3.38 …found
CGI::PSGI >= 0.12 …found
HTML::Mason::PSGIHandler >= 0.52 …found
Plack >= 0.9971 …found
Plack::Handler::Starlet …found
SMTP dependencies:
Net::SMTP …found
USERLOGO dependencies:
Convert::Color …found

All dependencies have been found.

# 4.6 Install RT and initialize RT database
After we have verified the Perl dependencies for RT have been met, we can start the install.
# make install

Congratulations. RT is now installed.

You must now configure RT by editing /opt/rt4/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm.

(You will definitely need to set RT’s database password in
/opt/rt4/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm before continuing. Not doing so could be
very dangerous. Note that you do not have to manually add a
database user or set up a database for RT. These actions will be
taken care of in the next step.)

After that, you need to initialize RT’s database by running
‘make initialize-database’

Lets now run the following command to create the RT database and user. We haven’t set the MySQL root password yet, so it will be “blank” by default.
# make initialize-database
/usr/bin/perl -I/opt/rt4/local/lib -I/opt/rt4/lib sbin/rt-setup-database –action init –prompt-for-dba-password
In order to create or update your RT database, this script needs to connect to your mysql instance on localhost as root
Please specify that user’s database password below. If the user has no database
password, just press return.

Password:
Working with:
Type: mysql
Host: localhost
Name: rt4
User: rt_user
DBA: root
max_allowed_packet is set to 1.0M, which limits the maximum attachment or email size that RT can process. Consider adjusting MySQL’s max_allowed_packet setting.
Now creating a mysql database rt4 for RT.
Done.
Now populating database schema.
Done.
Now inserting database ACLs.
Granting access to rt_user@’localhost’ on rt4.
Done.
Now inserting RT core system objects.
Done.
Now inserting data.
Done inserting data.
Done.

# 4.7 Configure Apache for RT
Set HTTP to HTTPS redirect for all incoming HTTP requests.
# cp /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf.orig
#vim /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf


#
# VirtualHost example:
# Almost any Apache directive may go into a VirtualHost container.
# The first VirtualHost section is used for requests without a known
# server name.
#
#
# ServerAdmin webmaster@dummy-host.example.com
# DocumentRoot /www/docs/dummy-host.example.com
# ServerName dummy-host.example.com
# ErrorLog logs/dummy-host.example.com-error_log
# CustomLog logs/dummy-host.example.com-access_log common
#

ServerName rt.dudulz.com:80
Redirect / https://rt.dudulz.com/

# cp /etc/httpd/conf.d/ssl.conf /etc/httpd/conf.d/ssl.conf.orig
# vim /etc/httpd/conf.d/ssl.conf


# Per-Server Logging:
# The home of a custom SSL log file. Use this when you want a
# compact non-error SSL logfile on a virtual host basis.
CustomLog logs/ssl_request_log \
“%t %h %{SSL_PROTOCOL}x %{SSL_CIPHER}x \”%r\” %b”

# Request Tracker
ServerName rt.corp.example.com:443
AddDefaultCharset UTF-8
DocumentRoot /opt/rt4/share/html
Alias /NoAuth/images/ /opt/rt4/share/html/NoAuth/images/
ScriptAlias / /opt/rt4/sbin/rt-server.fcgi/

Order allow,deny
Allow from all

SSLOptions +StdEnvVars

# service httpd configtest
Syntax OK
# vim /opt/rt4/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm


# You must restart your webserver after making changes to this file.

Set( $rtname, ‘example.com’);
Set( $Organization, ‘dudulz.com’);
Set( $Timezone, ‘US/Pacific’);
Set( $WebDomain, ‘rt.dudulz.com’);
Set( $WebPort, 443);
Set( $WebPath, ”);

# You must install Plugins on your own, this is only an example

# service httpd restart
Open a web browser and enter http://rt.dudulz.com (or https://rt.dudulz.com) into the web address field, then press the enter key to establish a secure connection to the RT server. If everything has been installed and configured correctly, you should be presented with the RT Login page.

The default administrative credentials are:
Username: root
Password: password

# mysql_secure_installation
# vim /opt/rt4/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm

Set( $rtname, ‘example.com’);
Set( $Organization, ‘dudulz.com’);
Set( $Timezone, ‘US/Pacific’);
Set( $WebDomain, ‘rt.dudulz.com’);
Set( $WebPort, 443);
Set( $WebPath, ”);
Set( $DatabasePassword, ‘Pa$$w0rD!’);

# mysql -u root -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MariaDB monitor. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MariaDB connection id is 3
Server version: 5.5.30-MariaDB MariaDB Server

Copyright (c) 2000, 2013, Oracle, Monty Program Ab and others.

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the current input statement.

MariaDB [(none)]> SET PASSWORD FOR ‘rt_user’@’localhost’ = PASSWORD(‘Pa$$w0rD!’);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> \q
# vim /etc/my.cnf.d/server.cnf


# this is read by the standalone daemon and embedded servers
[server]

# this is only for the mysqld standalone daemon
[mysqld]
max_allowed_packet=16M
innodb_buffer_pool_size=256M

# this is only for embedded server
[embedded]

# vim /etc/httpd/conf.d/fcgid.conf


# Sane place to put sockets and shared memory file
FcgidIPCDir /var/run/mod_fcgid
FcgidProcessTableFile /var/run/mod_fcgid/fcgid_shm

# Request Tracker
FcgidMaxRequestLen 1073741824

Restart the httpd daemon.
# service httpd restart

source:http://binarynature.blogspot.pt/2013/05/install-request-tracker-4.html

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